science-junkie:

3D Printed Organ : Vascular Networks Achieved
… Every cell within a human organ, such as the liver, kidney or heart are within a hair’s width of a blood supply.  This is an incredibly complex setup, one which up until now, researchers have found to be a nightmare to overcome when dealing with bioprinting. Without an adequate vascular network, the cells would be starved of oxygen, as well as a means to excrete waste, causing them to die and making the printed organs worthless.Scientists from the Universities of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT have been working together to overcome these mountainous hurdles. Today, the University of Sydney made a groundbreaking announcement. The team of scientists from all four universities have figured out a technique, making such vascularisation possible within the 3D bioprinting process…
Source: 3dprint.com

science-junkie:

3D Printed Organ : Vascular Networks Achieved

… Every cell within a human organ, such as the liver, kidney or heart are within a hair’s width of a blood supply.  This is an incredibly complex setup, one which up until now, researchers have found to be a nightmare to overcome when dealing with bioprinting. Without an adequate vascular network, the cells would be starved of oxygen, as well as a means to excrete waste, causing them to die and making the printed organs worthless.

Scientists from the Universities of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT have been working together to overcome these mountainous hurdles. Today, the University of Sydney made a groundbreaking announcement. The team of scientists from all four universities have figured out a technique, making such vascularisation possible within the 3D bioprinting process…

Source: 3dprint.com

compoundchem:

With American Independence Day around the corner, and the customary fireworks, here’s a look at the chemistry of gunpowder and its role in pyrotechnic displays: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lMAdapted from the quick and dirty graphic I created for the ask from wonderousscience - note that in that graphic, I accidentally swapped the percentages for potassium nitrate and charcoal! This graphic shows the correct percentages.

compoundchem:

With American Independence Day around the corner, and the customary fireworks, here’s a look at the chemistry of gunpowder and its role in pyrotechnic displays: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-lM

Adapted from the quick and dirty graphic I created for the ask from wonderousscience - note that in that graphic, I accidentally swapped the percentages for potassium nitrate and charcoal! This graphic shows the correct percentages.

sciencesourceimages:

It’s Time Once Again For Arachnophobia Theatre! 

What do you suppose would be an Arachnophobes’ worst nightmare? This spider can do what?! Jumping spiders are so named because of their amazing leaping ability. They are also known for their superior eyesight, considered one of the sharpest in the insect/arachnid world. They very expertly use their vision and springing ability to hunt and capture their prey.

Buy wall prints & postcards of Jumping Spiders

Jumping spiders generally hunt during the day. They have a well developed internal hydraulic system that extends their limbs by altering the pressure of body fluid within them. This enables the spiders to jump without having large muscular legs like grasshoppers. Most jumping spiders can jump several times the length of their bodies. When a jumping spider is moving from place to place, and especially just before it jumps, it tethers a filament of silk to whatever it is standing on to protect itself should the jump fail.

Click here to see more photos of Jumping Spiders

Images above © Scott Linstead / Science Source

BY7087 (Jumping Spider Attacking Cricket)

BY7151 (Apache Jumping Spider)

BY7153 (Cardinal Jumping Spider in Flower)

BY7156 (Regal Jumping Spider)

BY7122 (Regal Jumping Spider Jumping)

BY7784 (Regal jumping spider with prey)

compoundchem:

Love this idea - a print template for a 3D model showing electronegativities of elements in the periodic table. Source: http://www.k4.dion.ne.jp/~soilshop/
Template available here.

compoundchem:

Love this idea - a print template for a 3D model showing electronegativities of elements in the periodic table. 

Source: http://www.k4.dion.ne.jp/~soilshop/

Template available here.

Canadian, Eh?

yousucksir:

Grade 8 Student:  “Sir, did you know in Canada, we say eh, and down in America, they say huh?”

I whisper something.

Her:  “Sorry?”

I whisper again.

Her:  “Huh?”

Me:  “So, you’re American now?”

Her:  “What?”

Me:  “Eh?”

Her:  “Sir!”

science-junkie:

Butterflies use magnetic compass to fly across America

Monarchs are known to possess a Sun compass but even on cloudy days they still keep flying south towards Mexico. In a laboratory experiment, butterflies changed direction when the magnetic field around them was altered. It suggests that like turtles and birds the insects have a geomagnetic compass, says a study in Nature Communications.

Read more

Images: [x][x][x]

A Cold One

yousucksir:

Senior Student:  “Sir, you strike me as a beer man.”

Me:  “How can you tell?”

Him:  “Well, though you’re easily refined enough for wine, I doubt you’d have the patience to sit around reading about a beverage.  You’re a man of the people.”

I look at the pile of marking I have next on my desk.

Me:  “You know your essay’s in that stack, right?”

Him:  “Absolutely.”

themarysue:

fireandwonder:

ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.
LLS

do you realize how many scifi stories she is indirectly responsible for?  She discovered the inspiration for Dust in The Golden Compass.

Another female scientist whose discoveries have been all over Cosmos without a mention of her life. 

themarysue:

fireandwonder:

ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.

LLS

do you realize how many scifi stories she is indirectly responsible for?  She discovered the inspiration for Dust in The Golden Compass.

Another female scientist whose discoveries have been all over Cosmos without a mention of her life. 

(via techstuffhsw)

txchnologist:

A Thought-Provoking Toy

by Michael Keller

The spinning top above illustrates an unusual asymmetry where it flips over if spun in a clockwise motion and stays upright when spun counterclockwise. This behavior is a result of chirality, a property in which something displays handedness. When the an object or system is chiral, its mirror images can’t be exactly mapped to each other—like your right and left hands. 

Tadashi Tokieda, director of studies in mathematics at Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge, investigates and invents toys like the one above that exhibit interesting behaviors. He’s also a fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, where he presented what he calls the world’s first chiral tippy top. See the video with this and other toys that display chirality below.

Read More

(via coolsciencegifs)

wwbioteach:

hisnamewasbeanni:

sniffing:

When you tell a joke and no one laughs

image

AKA being a maths teacher.

Or a Science teacher