postgraphics:

Ebola spreads slower, kills more than other diseases
Compared to other infectious diseases, Ebola spreads slowly and to relatively few people. But it is extremely deadly: Thousands have been killed this year in West Africa, and more are falling ill every day.
Mathematical epidemiologists create far more complex models than the simulations above to answer three key questions about outbreaks: How contagious is it? How quickly will it spread? And how many people will it kill? These models help public health officials develop strategies to attack specific outbreaks.

postgraphics:

Ebola spreads slower, kills more than other diseases

Compared to other infectious diseases, Ebola spreads slowly and to relatively few people. But it is extremely deadly: Thousands have been killed this year in West Africa, and more are falling ill every day.

Mathematical epidemiologists create far more complex models than the simulations above to answer three key questions about outbreaks: How contagious is it? How quickly will it spread? And how many people will it kill? These models help public health officials develop strategies to attack specific outbreaks.

(via blackwing-the-raven)

science-junkie:

The Geological Society’s 100 Great Geosites

The UK and Ireland feature some of the most diverse and beautiful geology in the world, spanning most of geological time, from the oldest Pre-Cambrian rocks to the youngest Quarternary sediments.

Read more via geolsoc.org.uk

science-junkie:

The Strange and Radical New World of 3-D Printed Body Parts

A few years ago, if a horrific infection ate your jawbone, doctors had to build makeshift mandibles from your fibula, a process that left you sliced open as surgeons painstakingly whittled away at replacement bone. Yech.
Today they can just hit Control-P: Based on MRI and CT scans of your busted-up body parts, hyperspecialized 3-D printers produce custom replacements, no sculpture skills required. 
Read more (via WIRED)

science-junkie:

The Strange and Radical New World of 3-D Printed Body Parts

A few years ago, if a horrific infection ate your jawbone, doctors had to build makeshift mandibles from your fibula, a process that left you sliced open as surgeons painstakingly whittled away at replacement bone. Yech.

Today they can just hit Control-P: Based on MRI and CT scans of your busted-up body parts, hyperspecialized 3-D printers produce custom replacements, no sculpture skills required. 

Read more (via WIRED)

lucyintheskywithstarofdavids:

best-of-memes:

Not even lion

This is the best post I have seen all day

(via blackwing-the-raven)

furbearingbrick:

vampirequeeneffeffia:

rita-haxx:

Fucking Christ

These are technically still facts.

buzzkill facts totally need to be a thing

(Source: iraffiruse, via blackwing-the-raven)

A limerick:

infinitemachine:

toothlessrebel:

asgardiantelevision:

image

Doesn’t look like a limerick to you? Try this:

A dozen, a gross, and a score
Plus three times the square root of four
Divided by seven
Plus five times eleven
Is nine squared and not a bit more.

THE FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCCCKKKKKKK

::Slow applause::

(via chrisano)

sweetteascience:

nebula929:

weakinteractions:

Video-inspiration for aspiring women in physics!

If you’re a girl or a woman starting out in physics, watch this video! Now! Do not delay!

When I first started out in physics, as a junior in high school taking AP physics, I was starving for female role models. I remember poking through my textbook in my free time (because yes, I was a nerd) and coming upon pictures like this one:

How amazing, that in one place at one time there were so many incredibly influential and brilliant physicists. Einstein, Heisenberg, Pauli, Schrodinger, Dirac, Planck, the list goes on and on! But only one woman, Marie Curie.

And that made me profoundly sad!

I know from personal experience, in a male-dominated field, it helps so much to have other women to inspire you, to tell you that you can do this, to reassure you that it’s okay if physics is hard, and that you don’t have to be a genius to be a good physicist. 

So. Young women, if you’re out there, and you’re considering physics, but you’re struggling, or you love it but you’re not sure it’s for you, watch this video! Soak in the wisdom.

Watch this!  One of labmates is in it.

Late night feels! This is an absolute must watch for everyone, but especially young women. I love how obvious and tangible the passion is in this video.

(via scientific-women)

exchangealumni:

halftheskymovement:

13-year-old Alyssa Carson is determined to be the first person to land on Mars — and NASA thinks she stands a chance. Paul Foreman, from NASA says, “she is of perfect age to one day become an astronaut, to eventually travel to Mars. She is doing the right things, taking the right training, taking all of the right steps to actually become an astronaut.” 

Alyssa studies science, several languages and is the first person to attend all three of Nasa’s world space camps. Learn more about Alyssa’s mission via BBC

Another awesome Girl Hero!

(via scientific-women)

thejunglenook:

markscherz:

hyacynthus:

markscherz asking Jane Goodall her advice for women in the sciences. Tune in for her answer!

What an inspiration of a woman. A true hero.

I adore markscherz so much for asking this question.

(via scientific-women)